Resources

Share links to curricula,  ice breakers and activities for youth,  or projects/organizations making inroads in combating Islamophobia and racism.

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES:

Below is the beginning of an educational resources list compiled by Women Against Islamophobia & Racism (WAIR).  WAIR will continue to expand and update this list.  If you have suggestions for additions, please contact us through the WAIR website:  https://wairwomen.wordpress.com.

This Is Where I Need To Be — This website is the companion to the curriculum guide and the book, This is Where I Need to Be: Oral Histories of Muslim Youth in NYC. The book is a first-ever volume of oral history narratives told to and authored by Muslim American teenagers.

Middle East Institute, Columbia University — This special program, (Re)embracing Diversity in New York City Public Schools: Educational Outreach for Muslim Sensitivity, provided teachers with a fully integrated mini-curriculum that addresses the problem of intolerance towards Arab-, South Asian- and Muslim-Americans in the wake of the tragic events of 9/11.

Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding — Learn how you can leverage all the aspects of diversity, including (but not limited to) religion, to cultivate an atmosphere of shared learning and discovery for every student in your class. Includes the curriculum guide ‘Religion, Diversity and Conflict: The Park 51 Controversy.’

Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility — This site provides educators with timely teaching ideas to encourage critical thinking on issues of the day and foster a positive classroom environment. It is a project of Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility.

PBS Educational Resources — The resources offered here are designed to help you use the PBS Islam: Empire of Faith video series and companion website in secondary social studies, civics, religion, and language arts classes.

The Islam Project — The Islam Project is a multimedia effort aimed at schools, communities, and individuals who want a clearer understanding of this institution: complex, diverse, historically and spiritually rich, and–to many–mysterious and even forbidding. The project comprises two PBS documentaries, a vibrant community engagement campaign, and an ambitious educational effort.

Change the Story — The site offers an interactive experience where users—Muslim and non-Muslim alike—can meet their neighbors, learn about Islam and apply techniques of interfaith dialogue and action to local communities. Here you will find tools and helpful information for educators, religious leaders and individuals concerned about building bridges of understanding across lines of faith and culture.

American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) — This site is an interactive educational toolkit that explores how Arab, South Asian, and Muslim communities have responded to being targeted as “enemies” in the US government’s “war on terror.”

Facing History and Ourselves — Facing History and Ourselves delivers classroom strategies, resources and lessons that inspire young people to take responsibility for their world. Internationally recognized for our quality and effectiveness, Facing History harnesses the power of the Internet and partners with school systems, universities and ministries of education worldwide.

Reuniting the Children of Abraham — The Children of Abraham Project is a dramatic interpretation of the legacy of Abraham, whose life was the inspiration for Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. It was created in collaboration with youth from the three Abrahamic faiths.

Access Islam — Access Islam is a pioneering new tool designed to support the study of Islam in grades 4-8. The site also contains high quality, multi-media tools; downloadable lesson plans; and resources related to Islamic holidays, traditions and cultures.

Islam for Kids: Information on Islam — Basic information for kids on Islam’s founding, meaning, beliefs, holy book, place of worship, five Pillars, praying, different types, and festivals, plus a virtual tour of a mosque.

Safe and Caring Schools for Arabs and Muslim Students: A Guide for Teachers — This booklet will help teachers address discrimination and prejudice directed at Arab and Muslim students (or those perceived as such).

America at a Crossroads — America at a Crossroads was a major public television event premiering on PBS in April 2007 that explored the challenges confronting the post-9/11 world.

Project Explorer — Multi-media educational materials for upper elementary, middle, and high school students and for educators and parents on Jordan: Cultural Crossroads.  It focuses on 4 major themes: religion, the environment, culture, and history/archaeology.

Middle Eastern American Resources Online (MEARO) — MEARO provides educators, students, and professionals access to a variety of materials about Americans who trace their ancestry to the Middle East.

Publications on Islam, Muslim Youth, and Anti-Islamophobia Education

Rukhsana Khan — Contemporary children’s author and storyteller addressing Muslim cultural themes.

Arab American Institute — Arab American Institute (AAI) is a non-profit, nonpartisan national leadership organization. AAI was created to nurture and encourage the direct participation of Arab Americans in political and civic life in the United States. The site includes educational materials, reports, and other resources.

Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies — Annotated list on such topics as books, research, general information, the arts, civil/human rights, educational resources/curriculum, media, and philosophy.

Council on Islamic Education — Multiple resources for educators, including teaching guides and references.

Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture — Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture is dedicated to educating youth in Arabic language, arts, and culture. It is based in Philadelphia.

The Sikh Coalition — The Sikh Coalition is a community-based organization that works towards the realization of civil and human rights for all people. The site includes materials addressing school bullying and legal resources.

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